Author Archives : socrateslantern


April Teacher Talk

Posted by Deann Marin of Socrates Lantern

It’s April and so many groovy things are happening this month, Easter, Passover, spring vacation and so much more. Be sure to stop by and see what these teachers are doing in their classrooms and gather some great tips and ideas.

If you’re interested in joining this unique group of teacher entrepreneurs, blogging buddies and/or our blog linky, sign up here….The Best of Teacher Entrepreneurs Marketing Cooperative. If you decide to join, be sure to mention one of our names.

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If You Love Jelly Beans

By Deann Marin of Socrates Lantern

Can’t you just smell spring in the air? Daffodils beginning to bloom, Lilac trees starting to flower, and Lilies of the Valley popping up. I just love the aroma. Not only is my birthday in April but it brings us Passover, Easter, and one that you may never have heard of, can you guess? If you said Jelly Bean Day, you’d be right. It’s April 22nd.

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Plan a Portfolio Party

By Retta London of Rainbow City Learning

Plan a celebration for your young writers as they bloom in the Spring!

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April Math FUN!

By Sara Snyder of Snyder Classroom

Make Math FUN this Spring! These spring math riddles are great for reviewing previous topics or practicing current skills. These riddles can be helpful in your classroom at this busy time of year. (And sneak a little fun into the classroom) I have made these math riddles to combine fun and learning for this time of year.

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How Many Ways are Words Related?

By Susan Berkowitz of Susan Berkowitz

Individuals who use AAC need to learn to take a conscious path to the words they need. If they want an apple, they need to think about how to navigate to categories -> to food -> to fruit -> to apple. SLPs can help them learn how to do this.

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6 Tips to Support English Language Learners in Your Classroom

By Kathy Simpson of Sunshine and Lollipops

Do you have English Language Learners in your classroom? If you do…you will want to take a look at this post and discover 6 easy and fun tips to support your ELL students. I am sure you will LOVE #1!

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Apollo 13: The Ultimate STEM Challenges

By Kerry Tracy of Kerry Tracy

The Apollo 13 mission shows how seemingly insurmountable obstacles can be overcome with scientific reasoning and problem solving. Specifically, the carbon dioxide filter fix shows why STEM Challenges are so much more than just “fun.”

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The Magic of a Circle

By Kathie Yonemura of Tried and True Teaching Tools

Using only a circle, students fold and learn a multitude of geometric terms. This is a fantastic way to teach geometry and for students to experience more than just shapes!

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Increase Engagement and Maintain Rigor-Hands-on Fun in the Upper Grade and Middle School Classroom

By Marcy Howe of It’s a Teacher Thing

Maintaining student motivation is important during any time of year, but it’s even more crucial when they return from a break. I save several of my “great” activities for those Mondays after a week off.

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Poppies & Pantoums: Poetry Comes Alive with Georgia O’Keefe

By Tracy Willis of Wild Child Designs

4th and 5th grade students explore the life of Georgia O’Keefe via a biography and her fabulous artwork. We look closely at the natural world using photographs and author Pantoum poems, a cool poetic form from Malaysia. We recuperate from our testing angst with a poppy craft.

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Painting Poetry: Children’s Voices

By Virginia Musmanno of Reading Spotlight

We hope that you will take one minute out of your busy day to enjoy a slideshow of our paintings of poems. We hope that you enjoy seeing them as much as we enjoyed painting them!

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Make sure you visit these great posts from some awesome educators.


March Teacher Talk

St. Patrick’s day and so many teacher tried and true ideas are here for you this March. Best yet, spring is next week and the end of the year will be here before you know it.

If you’re interested in joining this unique group of teacher entrepreneurs, blogging buddies and/or our blog linky, sign up here….The Best of Teacher Entrepreneurs Marketing Cooperative. If you decide to join, be sure to mention one of our names.

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  Zen Classroom

  By Retta London of Rainbow City Learning

                                                               

Some ideas for bringing peace and calm to your classroom, using practices found in yoga.

 

                                                                           A Disciplined Child is a Happy Child                                                                               

  By Deann Marin of Socrates Lantern                                                                  

 I can’t express enough that one of the worst things a teacher can do is to prejudge a class or a student before they even enter the room. Let’s face it, some kids get along better with some teachers than they do with others, so it’s better to listen but with a grain of salt and                                                                                           make your own judgment.                                                                                                         

 

Make Math FUN this St. Patrick’s Day

By Sara Snyder of Snyder Classroom

St. Patrick’s Day can be a fun time of year and can break up break up the monotony of the winter months and make way for some fun! I think you will enjoy this limited release of engaging activities for students to use while still sticking with my curriculum. I have made these math riddles to combine fun and learning for this time of year.

Harnessing the Wind

By Kathie Yonemura of Tried and True Teaching Tools

Exploring NGSS physical science with some engineering! A true inspirational story motivate students to apply the engineering process to real life.

Illuminated Angles: Using Medieval History to Classify Angles

 Math doesn’t have to make you or your students cry. This explores one way to make measuring and classifying angles fun while “getting your history and literacy on.” Guaranteed teacher smiles AND student engagement.

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February Teacher Talk

Valentine Day, President’s Day, Black History Month, Kindness Week and so many teacher tried and true ideas are here for you this February. So pull up a chair sip some hot chocolate and savor some Valentine goodies will reading our englightening blog posts.

If you’re interested in joining this unique group of teacher entrepreneurs, blogging buddies and/or our blog linky, sign up here….The Best of Teacher Entrepreneurs Marketing Cooperative. If you decide to join, be sure to mention one of our names.

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Light up the World with Kindness

By Deann Marin of Socrates Lantern

Did you know that there is a Random Acts of Kindness Week? It runs from February 12 through the 18th. Actually, this is the first I’ve heard of it, but what a groovy  way for all of us to unite by being kind to each other.

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Make Math FUN this Valentine’s Day!

By Sara Snyder of Snyder Classroom

Valentine’s Day can be a fun time of year! It can a busy time and also little distracting. I have often found myself looking for fun yet engaging activities for my students to use while still sticking with my curriculum. I have made these math riddles to combine fun and learning for this time of year.

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AAC 101: Who Should Use AAC and Why?

By Susan Berkowitz of Susan Berkowitz

Anyone who does not have speech or whose speech is not sufficient to meet their needs should be considered for an AAC system.

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6 Ways To Help young Children Enjoy Non-Preferred Tasks

By Thia Triggs of Print Path


Whether you are a parent, teacher, or therapist, do you know children who would benefit from play experiences and practice performing tasks that do not come easily?

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The Broken-Winged Bird: Musings on Poetry and Complex Text

By Tracy Willis of Wild Child Designs

Wade into the deep end and use poetry in your reader’s workshop. This post lays out several strategies to deepen your students’ reading comprehension when using poetry. Explore compare/contrast, figurative language, character theory, and metaphorical thinking with Wild Child Designs.

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Use Your Literature Text to Teach History

By Marcy Howe of It’s a Teacher Thing

Sometimes I find exactly what I need in the most unlikely place. My literature anthology recently proved to be the perfect vehicle for teaching historical context, and the lesson went better than I could have imagined!

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Be sure to read the posts from the rest of the teachers in this month’s post link up.


January Teacher Talk

Posted by Deann Marin of Socrates Lantern

It’s 2017 Time sure flies. WE have some great ideas for you in our January edition of Teacher Talk. So hurry on over to see what these creative educators are doing this month.

If you’re interested in joining this unique group of teacher entrepreneurs, blogging buddies and/or our blog linky, sign up here….The Best of Teacher Entrepreneurs Marketing Cooperative. If you decide to join, be sure to mention one of our names.

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Is Vacation Over Already?

By Deann Marin of Socrates Lantern

I don’t know about you, but at one time, it was a real downer for me to return to school after vacation. Stress was my middle name, I’d spend time worrying what I was going to teach, wondering about the lessons I’d have to reteach and thinking about that parent meeting scheduled after vacation. I’d get really bummed out the day before until I learned a few tricks I’d like to share.

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Gifts of the New Year

By Retta London of Rainbow City Learning

Some gifts you can share with students this month.

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(Star)bursting for Rocks!

By Kathie Yonemura of Tried and True Teaching Tools

Party accessories make setting New Year’s goals the perfect connection to a healthy, whole student.

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Martin Luther King, Jr. Writing Prompts

By Kerry Tracy of Kerry Tracy

Use MLK’s brilliant quotes all month long to inspire quick writes! ***********************************************

Make Math FUN this Winter!

By Sara Snyder of Snyder Classroom

Engage your students with these Winter Math riddles worksheets! I began creating math riddles to make math more fun in my own classroom. I love hearing my students giggle as they solve the riddle at the end of the worksheet. Students solve problems, each problem has a letter assigned to it and the letters help to solve the riddle. It is a great way to combine fun and learning! Make math FUN!

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What is ACC?

By Susan Berkowitz of Susan Berkowitz

Do you know exactly what AAC is? Here is an informative post to help guide you.

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Tech Talk – The Online Subscription Dilemma

By Michelle Webb of Teaching Ideas for Those who Love Teaching

Stop worrying about how to pay for online subscriptions for your classroom.

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Fact or Fantasy? Organization 101 for Teachers

By Tracy Willis of Wild Child Designs

A humorous exploration of systems organization in an elementary classroom. This post explores ways to organize and support word study.

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Check out these blog posts from other teachers in our collaborative.


December Teacher Talk

Posted by Deann Marin of Socrates Lantern

It’s December and time for our holiday version of Teacher Talk. Getting ready for Christmas, Chanukah, Kwanza and New Years, we have some great ideas for you. So hurry on over to see what these creative educators are doing this month.


If you’re interested in joining this unique group of teacher entrepreneurs, blogging buddies and/or our blog linky, sign up here….The Best of Teacher Entrepreneurs Marketing Cooperative. If you decide to join, be sure to mention one of our names.

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A Celebration of Values

By Retta London of Rainbow City Learning

Reasons and ways to incorporate values into your lessons this holiday season.

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Election Musings in December

By Deann Marin of Socrates Lantern

I came across this letter, written by a father to his children after the election. He said what is probably on many of our minds.

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Make Math FUN this Christmas!

Engage your students with these Christmas Math riddles worksheets! I began creating math riddles to make math more fun in my own classroom. I love hearing my students giggle as they solve the riddle at the end of the worksheet. Students solve problems, each problem has a letter assigned to it and the letters help to solve the riddle. It is a great way to combine fun and learning! Make math FUN!

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AAC From A to Z: A is for Aided Language Input

By Susan Berkowitz of Susan Berkowitz

If you are supporting an AAC user, you’ll want to watch this short video about using Aided Language Stimulation. This is the first step in implementing augmentative communication.

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Keeping Your Students Engaged After a Vacation Break

By Marcy Howe of It’s a Teacher Thing

Learn tips for re-engaging students after a vacation break.

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MAKING SENSE OF NUMBERS – BEYOND COUNTING

By Thia Triggs of Print Path

Many children enter kindergarten being able to rote count. What comes next? There are 5 key elements of number sense within a kindergarten age group. 

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Forging Connections By Studying Family

By Michelle Webb of Teaching Ideas for Those Who Love Teaching

Why Studying Family with young children is so important.

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My Top Five Christmas Read Alouds

By Lisa Robles of LisaTeachR’s Classroom

Here are my top five Christmas read alouds with some ideas fro activities.

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Four Quick Strategies to Check for Understanding

By Shametria Routt of the Routty Math Teacher

As teachers, we are constantly assessing our students and gathering formative assessment data to drive our instructional decisions. When we use student feedback and data to make decisions, we cut-down on the time spent teaching concepts and skills our students already know or aren’t quite ready for yet. Check out four quick strategies you can use today to check for your students’ understanding.

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3 Sure-Fire Ways to Keep Kids Moving for Math

By Kathie Yonemura of Tried and True Teaching Tools

Keep students on task and engaged! 3 math resources that get students up & moving, while practicing math skills.

An Existential Tug-of-War: Making Thinking Visible with Tuck Everlasting

By Tracy Willis of Wild Child Designs

This post explores critical thinking routines using Tuck Everlasting by Natalie Babbitt. It shows the diversity of thinking that can occur in one novel study with upper elementary students. 

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Please hop on over to read these December blog posts.


November Turkey Talk

Posted by Deann Marin of Socrates Lantern

It’s November and time for our Thanksgiving version of Teacher Talk. Getting ready for Turkey Day, we have some great ideas for you. So hurry on over to see what these creative educators are doing this month.

If you’re interested in joining this unique group of teacher entrepreneurs, blogging buddies and/or our blog linky, sign up here….The Best of Teacher Entrepreneurs Marketing Cooperative. If you decide to join, be sure to mention one of our names.

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Thanksgiving Recipe Swap 

By Deann Marin of Socrates Lantern

Don’t you just love the aroma of turkey roasting in the oven? Sometimes I think that it smells better than it tastes. My mouth waters just thinking about it. Since Thanksgiving is the time for savory, mouth watering delights, how about having your class participate in a favorite recipe swap. This will get them ready for the holiday and have some fun while doing it.

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The Post Election Classroom

By Retta London of Rainbow City Learning

A strategy to use for healing post election anxiety that your students may be experiencing.

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Make Math FUN this Thanksgiving!

By Sara Snyder of Snyder’s Classroom

Engage your students with these Thanksgiving Math riddles worksheets! I began creating math riddles to make math more fun in my own classroom. I love hearing my students giggle as they solve the riddle at the end of the worksheet. Students solve problems, each problem has a letter assigned to it and the letters help to solve the riddle. It is a great way to combine fun and learning! Make math FUN!

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Getting Started with Google Classroom

By Lisa Robles of LisaTeachR’s Classroom

Here is a primer for getting started with Google Classroom!

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Thanksgiving STEM Challenge: Turkey Transporter

By Kerry Tracy of Kerry Tracy

Highly engaging STEM challenge to keep your kids focused before the holiday. Includes modifications for grades 2 – 8.

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Teach your student how to have a productive discussion

By Marcy Howe of It’s a Teacher Thing

Teach your student how to have a productive discussion.

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Understanding and Supporting Pencil Grasp Development: 3 – 6 years.

By Thia Triggs of Print Path

As a school based Occupational Therapist the most frequent issue teachers ask me about is pencil grasp. Today I will explore: What grasps look like in the major three categories. Why some grasps are more advantageous than others. What ages typically-developing children are using these three types of grasp.

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Passion and Purpose: Bravery in a Broken World

By Tracy Willis of Wild Child Designs

With this week’s news being the icing on the cake, it’s imperative that we remember our passion and purpose in the classroom. This is the story of how one educator does just that, along with some resources, paid and free for doing so.

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Be sure to visit these blog posts in the linky for more details about these awesome ideas.

 


October Teacher Talk 3

Posted by Deann Marin of Socrates Lantern

It’s BOO-tober and time for October Teacher Talk. Getting ready for Halloween and other Autumn holidays, you don’t want to miss this issue of Teacher Talk. So hurry on over to see what these creative educators have to say for this month.

If you’re interested in joining this unique group of teacher entrepreneurs, blogging buddies and/or our blog linky, sign up here….The Best of Teacher Entrepreneurs Marketing Cooperative. If you decide to join, be sure to mention one of our names.

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Journals: From a Kid’s Point of View

By Retta London of Rainbow City Learning

Part one of a blog series about journaling, as told by fourth graders!

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BOO-Tober Time for Sensory Poetry

By Deann Marin of Socrates Lantern

It’s BOOtober and the perfect time to get those creative juices flowing in your 5-8 grade students. Fall is the perfect season for this. Can’t you just hear the rustling of leaves under your feet, or the howling wind as the days begin to grow colder. How about biting into that first crisp red apple of the season. I just love Macouns, my tongue waters as I think about the tart sweetness of my favorite fruit.

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BOO! MEOW! EEK! WHHOO! HA-HA-HA!

By Gini Musmanno of Reading Spotlight

The natural rhythm of songs and poetry enhances fluency, especially for beginning and struggling readings. Add fun with sound effects and then add even more fun by recording the results!

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Multiply the Fun

By Kathie Yonemura of Tried and True Teaching Tools

Combine task cards with QR code and students BEG to practice multiplication!

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Make Math FUN this Halloween!

By Sara Snyder of Snyder Classroom


Make Math FUN this Halloween with these engaging Math Riddles! Each problem corresponds to a letter that helps to solve the riddle at the bottom of the page. My students love these!

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3 Ways for AAC Users to Get their Game Face On

By Susan Berkowitz of Susan Berkowitz

If you’re looking for some fun and spooky Halloween activities for speech-language therapy, here are some ideas for you, and a free resource, too.

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Halloween STEM Challenge: Ghosts in the Graveyard

By Kerry Tracy of Kerry Tracy

Keep your kids engaged this Halloween with spooky STEM challenges!

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Pumpkin Themed Activities and Resources

By Alison Monk of the Literacy Garden

It’s that time of year again! Pumpkin mania!! Yes, I am also quite a fan of everything PUMPKIN. I love the soothing taste of a Pumpkin Spice Chai Tea or the delightful aroma of pumpkin scented soaps and air fragrances. And don’t forget the pumpkin roll with the cream cheese filling!!! So, now that you are drooling with me, how about some pumpkin ideas for your home and classroom?

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Math Routines to Boost Student Achievement

By Shametria Routt of The Routty Math Teacher

Check out four classroom routines that will allow you to use your time both effectively and efficiently, increase critical thinking skills, and boost student achievement at the same time. This series highlights four of my favorite routines: starters, number talks, math talks, and daily problem solving. These routines are tried and true and through this series I share how I made them work for me and my students in my own classroom. 

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Positive Behavioral Supports for PreK Classrooms

By Thia Triggs of Print Path

As I began working on a new Visual Schedule project for PreK, I did a little digging into research-based practices to support positive behaviors in preschool classrooms. What did I find? 

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Setting Up Captivating Stations

By Mary Moore of Moore Resources

As I was considering how to do these and captivate interest, I decided to utilize my new ‘math stations idea’ and create ” Colorful Captivating Station Bags”. To create these great engaging station bags….read more at MMooreEducationalResources.com/blog

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Be sure to visit the blog posts in the linky for more details about these awesome ideas for the month of October.


September Teacher Talk

Posted by Deann Marin of Socrates Lantern

septrember-teacher-talk

It’s September Teacher Talk Time…..Hopefully everyone is off to a great school year with the best classes ever.  We have so many great tips and ideas for you from awesome educators. Be sure to take a look at what everyone has to say.

 If you’re interested in joining this unique group of teacher entrepreneurs, blogging buddies and/or our blog linky, sign up here….The Best of Teacher Entrepreneurs Marketing Cooperative. If you decide to join, be sure to mention one of our names.

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Remembering 9/11

I remember September 11 as if it were yesterday. I woke up to a spectacular morning, not a cloud in the deep blue sky. The day was simply perfect.

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My Class Won’t Stop Talking!

By Retta London of rainbow City Learning

A few tips on how to handle the chattiest class ever! 

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Creating Welcome Signs for Open House

It’s Back to School time! Open house is coming soon, therefore, I wanted to share with you two ‘Welcome Sign In’ Signs I created this year. The purpose of my sign is for parents and guardians to see it, feel welcome, and as a reminder for them to please sign in on the sign in sheet I will lay out.

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Back to School Math Riddles

By Sara Snyder of Snyder Classroom

The beginning of the year can be hard for students as they adjust back into the routine an rigors of school. I am always trying to find ways to make math fun and approachable in my classroom. These math riddles are just the thing to help students practice the skills that they need to refresh, but also add a bit of fun to the computation too!

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In Defense of the “Lazy” Teacher

By Kerry Tracy of Kerry Tracy

Has any profession been so profoundly misunderstood as teaching? 

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How to Set Up Visual Supports for Whole Group Instruction

By Thia Triggs of Print Path

This tutorial will help you make your own visual supports for positive behaviors.

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The 12 Days of Back to School

By Shametria Routt of The Routty Math Teacher

“On the twelfth day of back to school, my principal gave to me twelve students learning, eleven cutters cutting, ten songs for singing, nine clocks ticking, eight kids-a-thinking, seven books for reading, six games for playing, five packs of pens, four bulletin boards, three supply bins, two oversized rugs, one cluttered classroom and a mixed-up set of TEs.” Celebrate the Back to School season with “The 12 Days of Back to School” blog series! Read about my tips, tricks, and strategies to get ready for the new school year.  

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Reducing Pencil Issues in the Classroom

By Marcy Howe of It’s a Teacher Thing

Here’s a great blog post and video tutorial to help you reduce wasted time in your classroom by eliminating pencil issues.

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August Teacher Talk 1

Posted by Deann Marin of Socrates Lantern

It’s August Teacher Talk Time…..Hopefully many of you are still enjoying your summer

vacation. Some of you are back to school already, while others are getting your classrooms ready for an exciting new school year. We have so many great tips and ideas for you from awesome educators. Be sure to take a look at what everyone has to say.

If you’re interested in joining this unique group of teacher entrepreneurs, blogging buddies and/or our blog linky, sign up here….The Best of Teacher Entrepreneurs Marketing Cooperative. If you decide to join, be sure to mention one of our names.

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Teaching Tolerance During this Election Season

By Deann Marin of Socrates Lantern

I don’t know about you, but this was the first political convention I’ve followed with interest and a great degree of concern. We need to embrace our diversity, to look for the good in each other, and notice the positive things we see happening every day.


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R-E-S-P-E-C-T

Some tips for bringing respect back to your classroom.

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Setting Up Your Classroom With Style

This time of year I love to find new ideas to make my classroom functional, yet cute. The way I figure it, I spend more awake hours in my classroom than any other room in my house. So, why not make it visually appealing! Here are some ideas that are functional, yet adorable at the same time.

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5 Teacher Must-haves for Back to School: Working on a Budget

My top five must haves for the classroom teacher!

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Back-to-School Ice Breaker

Do you hate ice breakers? Me too. That’s why I created something a little different for grade 4 – 8 to enjoy!


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Using Productive Struggle to Promote a Growth Mindset

By Shametria Routt of The Routty Math Teacher

“Using Productive Struggle to Promote a Growth Mindset” is the second part of my Summer PD with The Routty Math Teacher blog series. In this four-part series, I define productive struggle, advocate for its purpose and usefulness in the classroom, illustrate how it is reflected in a teacher’s instructional decisions, offer a list of expectations for both students and teachers during productive struggle, provide an opportunity to see productive struggle in action via a Teaching Channel video, and connect productive struggle with growth mindsets. 


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 It’s Back to School Time! Have fun with the Marshmallow Tower Project!

By Mary Moore of Moore Resources

I will be implementing a project the first week of school, “The Marshmallow Tower Project”, shared with me at a Teaching Summit in June. Materials needed are: A box of….


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Using Handwriting Without Tears to Teach Printing

By Thia Triggs of Print Path

Most every Occupational Therapist that I have ever met loves the Handwriting Without Tears© [HWT] program to teach handwriting. But not every OT, and many teachers and school districts do not use this program. Why not? I would like to discuss what I have observed about advantages and disadvantages of using HWT. 


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Tips For Teaching The Presidential Election

By Michelle Webb of Teaching Ideas For Those Who Love Teaching 

Tips for teachers to use while teaching about the Presidential Election.


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What Happens When a Classroom Theme Drives Instruction?

By Tracy Willis of Wild Child Designs

When teachers talk about themes, they’re usually talking about classroom decor. But could they be missing out on some real instructional power? Let your themes drive your instruction for the entire school year!

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Hop on over to visit the blogs from other teachers in our cooperative.


Teaching Tolerance During this Election Season 1

I don’t know aVote imagebout you, but this was the first political convention I’ve followed with interest and a great degree of concern.  We need to embrace our diversity, to look for the good in each other, and notice the positive things we see happening every day.  I was appalled by what I saw occur during the Republican convention. It was shocking to witness such divisiveness, hate, pessimism and fear mongering. Everything was dark and ominous.  Our country wasn’t built on that. It was built on faith, optimism, a genuine caring for each other and working together for the greater good. That is the American way!  We teach our children to be compassionate, to respect each other no matter their race, or religion, and to find something positive in everything and everyone. How can we expect them to believe us when they see a bully running for president, an individual who has no respect for women, disabled people, minority groups, immigrants, even experienced judges, let alone heroic veterans and those in the military who have dedicated their lives to serving our country and protecting our freedom.

What if this irresponsible, inexperienced, bigoted person, whose only accomplishment is enriching himself while cheating and taking advantage of others less powerful, were to become leader of the free world? Will he stop and erode all the hard fought progress made by honest, hard working champions for our way of life?

So how do you respond when a young person asks, “Why is this bully running for president, I’m afraid of him,” or “Why doesn’t he like Mexicans, is he going to send us back to Mexico? We have to let our kids know that just because he has succeeded at something, doesn’t mean he’s someone to follow or vote for.  That freedom of speech is part of our constitution and the law of the land allowing anyone to exercise it freely. Sadly, has taken advantage of this.

Let your kids know that anger is a normal emotion, sometimes we all feel this way. The main goal is to allow one  to express his/her feelings and not to keep them bottled up inside.  We need to let them know that sometimes people say hurtful things when they are frightened, unhappy, immature, and jealous of those who have been successful in their lives. Bullies often feel threatened by the accomplishments of others so they lash out.

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  1. Parents and/or teachers should ask questions and listen to what the kids have to say.

Here are some tips.

  • Ask what they think about the presidential nominees
  • Who are the candidates?
  • What kind of people are the candidates?
  • What are some of the things they’ve been talking about?
  • Who would you vote for and why?

two

  1. Express how you feel and give clear reasons why. This will help children learn coping skills when they feel unhappy, angry and fearful. These actions will aid them in understanding that they have choices, are connected and empowered.
  • This is an opportunity to hold a discussion about differencesof opinion, how to debate respectfully, and how to fight for a cause. Create various scenarios that they can role play.
  • Use historical events to help make sense out of what is happening today. Spend classroom time talking about current events on a daily basis. Do not try to sway their opinion with your own.
  • Parents should also join in with a statement of how they feel about the election.
  • They could do the following with their children, view anti-racial speeches. attend a rally, write a letter to the candidate, take their child to vote with them.

 three

  1. Last, but not least, allow the children to speak freely about anything that is on their mind. Be honest and sincere when answering their questions.

The way influential adults act and talk about women, immigrants and each other is important. It is the basis for how our kids view the government, society and relationships.  If this negativity continues, it will change our world for the worse and we don’t want to go to a place that we will never be able to return from. As adults, it is our responsibility to say what is on our mind, to let our voices be heard by voting, and to be role models for our charges.
I have strong feelings this election season, and I hope that I haven’t offended anyone with this post.  Thanks for reading….

Deann

http://www.philly.com/philly/blogs/healthy_kids/How-do-you-talk-to-your-kids-about-Trump.html

How to Talk to Your Kids about Donald Trump

http://www.yesmagazine.org/peace-justice/how-to-talk-with-your-kids-about-donald-trump-20160415

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Back to School Binder for classroom activities and decoration.

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Be sure to enter TBOTEMC’s Rafflecopter for a chance to win a $100 gift certificate to Teachers Pay Teachers. Please remember to enter my name Deann Marin and my Tpt store Socrates Lantern on the referral section of the registration form.

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This is part of our August Teacher Talk, so head on over to the other posts to see the tips/ideas from all of our educators.

August Teacher Talk.007


July Teacher Talk

Posted by Deann Marin of Socrates Lantern



It’s July Teacher Talk time…..The 4th of July is over…..Now all of you are into your laid back summer mode enjoying your well deserved rest. Sit down, sip some iced tea, or wine cooler and check out the blog tips and ideas from these educators.If you’re interested in joining this unique group of teacher entrepreneurs, blogging buddies and/or our blog linky, sign up here….The Best of Teacher Entrepreneurs Marketing Cooperative. If you decide to join, be sure to mention one of our names. 


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Tackling Tough Issues

By Retta London of Rainbow City Learning

Some tips for teaching and discussion of the upcoming election.

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Summer Writing Ideas for your Children

Calling all parents, summer is the time for fun and relaxation for everyone, esp the kids. However, you don’t want them to lose some of the writing skills that they learned during the school year. Here are some fun things to do to keep their creative juices flowing.

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The Art-Math Connection

By Kathie Yonemura of Tried and True Teaching Tools

Tessellations are the perfect vehicle to teach transformational geometry. Simple, step-by-step directions to teach geometry with art.

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5 Keys to STEM Challenge Success

By Kerry Tracy of Plans for a Better Tomorrow

What are the 5 most important things to know to conduct successful STEM challenges? Check this blog and video post to find out!

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Using Calendars: Number Fluency, Handwriting Skills, and Time Concepts

By Thia Triggs of Print Path

I have been using several calendar related tools and love the power they hold. Use of calendars and teaching about time is a functional and engaging activity to support number fluency, understanding of quantities, time related vocabulary, and building a perceptual map of time. Beyond that, it helps to promote character development around issues of waiting, and delay of gratification. 

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How Do You Plan to Model AAC?

By Susan Berkowitz of Kidz Learn Language

Getting started with modeling AAC use and using Aided Input with your nonverbal child who is beginning to use augmentative communication is easier if you plan your vocabulary in advance.

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Battling Summer Boredom

By Alison Monk of The Literacy Garden

Summer vacations are tons of fun and adventure. But, how about all those days at home? No need to get bored! Here are some great ideas to keep your kids engaged, interested, and active!

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The Beginner’s Guide to Planning the First Weeks of School

By Jessica Zannini of Notes from the Portable

Are you planning your first two weeks to set students up for success? I had a few bumpy years that helped me learn my mistakes and help make these weeks the ones to get my classroom up and running.

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No More Keywords: Using the Operation Situations to Help Students Analyze Word Problems

By Shametria Routt of The Routty Math Teacher

“No More Keywords: Using the Operation Situations to Help Students Analyze Word Problems” is the first article in my Summer PD with The Routty Math Teacher blog series. In this article, I discuss the dangers of using keywords to solve math word problems, present arguments against the use of keywords, and offer a new strategy to refocus students’ learning on critical thinking and sense-making. This is a must-read article for all teachers of mathematics as we begin preparing for the new school year. 

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So, What the Heck is Metacognition?

By Tracy Wills of Wild Child Designs

A reflection of a year-long investigation into metacognition with third and fourth graders, this post explores the use of a continuum to describe student thinking. A free downloadable version of the continuum is available for readers!

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June Teacher Talk

Posted by Deann Marin of Socrates Lantern



It’s June Teacher Talk time…..many of you are finished with school now and breathing a sigh of relief.  Sit back, relax and read some informative blog posts from our veteran educators. 

Have a well deserved summer vacation.


If you’re interested in joining this unique group of teacher entrepreneurs, blogging buddies and/or our blog linky, sign up here….The Best of Teacher Entrepreneurs Marketing Cooperative. If you decide to join, be sure to mention one of our names. 

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End of the Year Musings

 I always approach the end of the school year with mixed emotions, though I’m ecstatic to be out for summer vacation, I always feel a little sad saying good-bye. Many of my soon to be 7th graders hug me and leave with tears in their eyes, knowing that our little family will no longer be together. All the trials and tribulations, the challenges, the fun times and sad times will always be with us, but it will never be the same.

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A Portfolio to Remember – Part 2: Creating the Masks

By Retta London of Rainbow City Learning

How to make life cast masks with your students, and how to use the masks to decorate a keepsake writing portfolio.

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Summer Review Going Into Grade 2

Avoid the summer slide with this NO PREP resource. The beachy themed pages include daily math and reading skill practice for children about to enter 2nd grade. Perfect for parents to use and teachers to give!

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But All You Do is Play!

The work of young children is play! Playing is how young children interact with and learn from the world. Building language skills in children does, indeed, involve a lot of play. 

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Get out of Post-it Purgatory

Are you a TpT seller or just someone with a LOT on your to-do list? This free, online tool will change your life!

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More Than Just Art!

Mandalas are much more than just art! This simple geometry lesson not only creates beautiful classroom displays, but reinforces geometric concepts.

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End of the School Year Ideas!

Here are my top end of the school year ideas!

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Math, Monet & Measurement

Inspired by a visit to Monet’s garden in Giverny, a teacher shares her experience and inspires an investigative math project. Students create centimeter, millimeter, and decimeter garden models while learning about Impressionism and Claude Monet. Inspired math!

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End of the Year Musings

 

By Deann Marin of Socrates Lantern

Baby Canada GeeseI always approach the end of the school year with mixed emotions, though I’m ecstatic to be out for summer vacation, I always feel a little sad saying good-bye.  Many of my soon to be 7th graders hug me and leave with tears in their eyes, knowing that our little family will no longer be together. All the trials and tribulations, the challenges, the fun times and sad times will be always be with us, but it will never be the same.

Reflecting back to the beginning of the year, I remember how small they were when they first entered my room, some shy and nervous about their first few days, others acting cool trying to impress their peers., especially those they don’t know. The first hurdle over, they’ve opened their lockers. Simple process for some while others end up in tears because they can’t figure out how to do it. By the end of the year, they look back at this and laugh at themselves.

How strict I am the first few weeks, trying very hard not to crack a smile. This is the time to get them into shape. so that we all have a great year. They learn the rules and always test me.  Finally, after awhile, I can let my hair down and be myself. I can crack jokes, they can joke around and we can all laugh together. This is when real learning takes place, and to see their “ah ha,” moments is what teaching is all about.

I love 6th graders, the majority are so willing to learn, that it makes teaching rewarding and enjoyable.. One of my favorite things is our morning discussions. Their backgrounds are quite diverse and I learn something new almost everyday. Many are knowledgeable about a lot of things and they’re eager to share. They can talk about whatever is on their mind, and they feel safe doing so. We are now, officially a family and I’ve become their surrogate parent.Sandhill Crane Flying

As I say good-bye, each of my kids takes a part of me with them.  I feel certain that I’ve given them the support, strength and confidence to move on to seventh grade.   The time has come for them to spread their wings a fly.

When I close the door for the final time, I take comfort in knowing that soon I’ll have another bunch of little chickadees to bring up.

 

Have a wonderful summer

Deann

 

 

 

 

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On a closing note, please download my free, School Memories, you can use this for the last day of school.

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Here are a few more items

 

Something for the end of the year and something for the beginning.

 

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Please visit Socrates Lantern’s Social Media Sites





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This post is part of our June Teacher Talk Blog link-up.  Please click on the links below.If you’re interested in joining this unique group of teacher entrepreneurs, blogging buddies and/or our blog linky, sign up here….The Best of Teacher Entrepreneurs Marketing Cooperative. If you decide to join, be sure to mention my name. 

Teacher Talk June


May Teacher Talk

Posted by Deann Marin of Socrates Lantern

 

It’s May, only a short time till you can kick back and take a break. To help get you there, we have have so many things to share with you in this edition of May Teacher Talk. There are posts about engaging your classes till the end of the year, end of the year memories, summer stem activities, number writing instruction, reading comprehension ideas, iPad Apps for learning, advice for teacherpreneurs and so much more.  So sit back, relax and take a look at our posts.

If you’re interested in joining this unique group of teacher entrepreneurs, blogging buddies and/or our blog linky, sign up here….The Best of Teacher Entrepreneurs Marketing Cooperative. If you decide to join, be sure to mention one of our names. 

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A Portfolio to Remember

By Retta London of Rainbow City Learning

Ways to pull together a show-stopping portfolio collection for every student at the end of the year.
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Tips for Engaging Your Students Through the End of the Year

The end of the school year is just around the corner. You’re looking forward to summer vacation and so are your students, but you still have at least 6 or more weeks left, so what do you do to keep those children tuned in to learning.

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Flash Freebie, TpT Milestone Celebration!

By Thia Triggs of Print Path

This Number Writing product is one of my best sellers. It is yours free, for a limited time!

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 Are You Getting Overwhelmed the last few months of School?

By Mary Moore of Moore Resources

Don’t Stress the Last Few Months of School! It is so hard NOT to get overwhelmed, especially the last month or so of school! Read below on some tips and resources I always try to remember….at MMooreEducationalResources.com

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Can You Make 200 of Them?

By Susan Berkowitz of Susan Berkowitz

It takes 200 opportunities per day for an augmentative communication user to learn how to use the AAC system. We need to provide those opportunities within the context of daily activities & routines. Here are some suggestions on how to do that.

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Summer STEM Olympics

By Kerry Tracy of Kerry Tracy

Teachers, does the end of the year find you struggling to provide meaningful, enjoyable lessons? Never fear, Summer STEM Challenge Olympics are here! (Includes modifications for grade 2 – 8.)

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Wacky days in May and activities to go with them!

By Lisa Robles of LisaTeachR’s Classroom

Get some stress out from testing! Do some fun activities with special days in May and some wacky ones!

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Comprehension is as Easy as ABC

By Kathie Yonemura of Tried and True Teaching Tools

A tried and true teaching tool to ensure student engagement and comprehension while reading!

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iPad Apps for Kids- a 6-Part Blog Series

By Shametria Routty of the Routty Math Teacher

iPad and tablet use in the classroom has gained much popularity over the last few years and they’re being used nationwide as engaging learning tools for students. “iPad Apps for Kids” is a 6-part blog series featuring cool math iPad apps that can be used for intervention, tutoring, and summer practice tools for all students, inside or outside of the classroom setting. While all of the apps are free, you may have to make a purchase for a nominal fee to take full advantage of the app’s features; however, the free aspects are very useful and engaging just the same. 

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What I Have Learned on TPT-Part 2

By Marcy Howe of It’s a Teacher Thing

Read some of my top discoveries on my teacher-author journey.

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April Teacher Talk

It’s April, only a few more months to go till the end of the school year. We have have so many things to share with you in this edition of April Teacher Talk. So sit back, relax and take a look at our posts.

If you’re interested in joining this unique group of teacher entrepreneurs and blogging buddies and our blog linky, sign up here….The Best of Teacher Entrepreneurs Marketing Cooperative. If you decide to join, be sure to mention one of our names. 


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April is Poetry Month

 I just love teaching poetry and spring is the perfect time. For me, inspiration comes from being outside, perhaps walking on the beach inhaling the salty ocean air, or just walking through the woods with my husband and beautiful husky who is no longer with us. Oh and April is Poetry month.

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Make a Splash in April

By Retta London of Rainbow City Learning

Step by step instructions for an art project to motivate students for “April is Poetry Month”.

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Scientific Method: Neglect & Regrets

Are your students mere collectors of data, or do they analyze & interpret data? This blog relates an epiphany I had that changed my science-teaching game for good!  

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Autism & Learning to Use a Public Restroom: Tips for Parents and Teachers 

By Thia Triggs of Print Path

Learning to use the bathroom in public places or at school can be a struggle for children on the spectrum. Read this post for tips on how to make the process of using new bathrooms fun, interesting, and successful!

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More Core in Shared Reading for AAC Users

By Susan Berkowitz of Susan Berkowitz

This post is about using core words and more descriptive teaching rather than referential teaching. Not only does this encourage higher level thinking skills, it means AAC users can more easily participate in comprehension activities.

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Don’t Let the Pencil Craze Get to You!

Mary Moore of Moore Resources

Are pencils driving you crazy? Students not having a pencil? Losing them? Breaking the tip? The pencil craze got to me too! It doesn’t need to! During my student teaching we had cups with pencils at each group that we sharpened every morning and ensured there were plenty in each cup, which was great! That was in first grade. Over the years, I became use to about 2-3 students per class not having a pencil, therefore, I always purchased a box or two at a time and handed pencils out to those students. This year was a little different for me and the pencil craze got me! So many lost pencils, broken pencil tips, or students just didn’t have a pencil. I felt pencil cross eyed! A solution must be found!!! After much thought I came up with my “Pencil Station”!

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Nothing Like Non-Fiction

By Kathie Yonemura of Tried and True Teaching Tools

Using non-fiction will renew the love of learning in your classroom! Immersing students in reading & writing workshop: use non-fiction to teach note-taking, text features and formats!

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Calculator Challenges

By Shametria Routt of The Routty Math Teacher

Calculators are wonderful tools for the classroom and can provide valuable learning opportunities for our students. In fact, in the Common Core State Standards for Math, Mathematical Practice Standard 5 requires that students use “tools strategically.” To support this goal, this series includes 4 calculator-based activities that can be used to challenge your students in the mathematics classroom.

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EdTech Tips: Google My Maps

By Lisa Robles of LisaTeachR’s Classroom

Ways to use Google My maps in the classroom!

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8 Highly Effective Practices for Teaching Printing

By Thia Triggs of Print Path

Don’t have time to take to a class? Improve the effectiveness of your handwriting instruction with these easy to follow research-based tips!

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What I Have Learned on TPT-Part One

By Marcy Howe of It’s a Teacher Thing

Advice from one teacher’s journey to becoming a teacher-entrepreneur on TPT. This four-part blog series includes strategies for finding help and feeling success.

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Georgia, Poppies & Poetry

By Tracy Wills of Wild Child Designs

This post outlines how to use sentence stems and visible thinking routines to respond to Georgia O’Keefe’s art. It includes some great picture book recommendations as well!

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April is Poetry Month

By Deann Marin of Socrates Lantern

 

virginia-live-oak-440351_1920 smallI just love teaching poetry and spring is the perfect time. For me, inspiration comes from being outside, perhaps walking on the beach inhaling the salty ocean air, or just walking through the woods with my husband and beautiful husky who is no longer with us.

 

I want my classes to experience the wonderful feeling of just being outside and creating. That’s why I  teach poetry in April or May, new awakenings, flowers coming up, birds beginning to nest, and the warmth that replaces the winter cold.  So I pick a sunny day, take the class outside and have them write a nature poem using all of their senses. I tell them to breathe in the fresh air, so we take some deep yoga breaths, then sit on the grass and listen to the sounds of nature with closed eyes, making notes of what they hear, the things they see, and what they feel.

We might also hug trees, smell flowers and listen to the sounds of insects while watching them complete their instinctual activities.  One of my favorite things to do is to have the kids find a tree to lie under, to look up through the branches at the sky, or to watch the leaves fluttering in the breeze. To listen to the sound of birds and watch little insects buzzing about their business. I ask them to look at the colors and to pretend that they are the color, or the insect, or the bird, or the tree.  I want them to feel the strength of the tree and realize how secure and grounded the tree is because of it’s roots that run so deeply under the ground.

My students have created  some amazing poems from this activity and many of them have gotten published in a book entitled  Celebration of Young Poets-Creative Communication, Inc. The web address is www.poeticpower.com.

This is an example of a poem that a 6th grade student wrote after completing this activity. To tell you I was blown away by this is an understatement.

Azure Drake

Azure blossoms at my feet

Beside the road smelling sweet

To the shade of a Sycamore tree

Swaying branches over me…..Whispering

Footsteps coming down the path

An ancient one with wooden staff

Long white beard and cloak blue smeared

Electric eyes not to be feared…Scintillating

A Druid friend from long ago

The magic words sure to know

Staff held high over azure flowers

Secret words of light and power…..Conjuring

Rustling in the indigo bed

Rising up scales, tail and head

Wisdom eyes, majestic wings

Breath of lightning, Dragon sings…..Thundering

Climbing on blue scaled back

Soaring on white cloud track

Snow capped mountains, Seas of sand

Born of air Free of land….Dreaming

by Sean Hayden

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Featured Products

Thanks so much for stopping by

Deann

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Please visit Socrates Lantern’s Social Media Sites





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This is part of our Teacher Talk Blog Link-up. A great month ahead with loads

of ideas that will help get you through the rest of the year.

If you’re interested in joining this unique group of teacher entrepreneurs and blogging buddies as well as our blog linky, sign up here….The Best of Teacher Entrepreneurs Marketing Cooperative.  If you decide to join, be sure to mention my name

April Teacher Talk Word Press


March Teacher Talk

Posted by Deann Marin of Socrates Lantern

Welcome to our March Teacher Talk.  All of us from the Teacher Talk collaborative would like wish you a Happy St. Patrick’s Day.  We have so many fab things this month from  Women’s History Month to Reading and Math activities, as well as Easter Stem Olympics, there’s even a post on Kite Flying to reward your classes for good behavior. So relax with a cup of coffee or a glass of wine and take a look at what these educators have to say. You’ll be happy you did!

If you’re interested in joining this unique group of teacher entrepreneurs and blogging buddies and our blog linky, sign up here….The Best of Teacher Entrepreneurs Marketing Cooperative. If you decide to join, be sure to mention one of our names. 

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Lead Like a Girl

Finding positive role models for our students in Women’s History.

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Let’s Go Fly a Kite

  When I taught special needs kids, each month we would do something special for those who earned enough points. One of their favorite activities was to make and fly kites in March. Years later, I was mainstreamed to 6th grade and the children also loved this activity. After they flew their kites, they wrote two papers, one explaining how to make a kite and the other about their experience.

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Women’s History Month

It’s Women’s History Month. Here are some great books to read to your kids!

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Pi Day is March 14th

By Vicky Rauch of Scipi

What is Pi Day? Why was March 14th chosen?

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Using Core Words Every Day

By Susan Berkowitz of Susan Berkowitz

Teaching AAC users to communicate doesn’t take a lot of fancy materials or extra planning. Most of the time it’s as simple as engaging the learner with what he likes to do.

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Fast-Paced Fractions

By Kathie Yonemura of Tried & True Teaching Tools

Fraction review is filled with action & movement! Playing Scoot gets students up & moving, while practicing fraction concepts!

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March Into Eggstravagant Math

By M. Moore of Moore Resources

March into an Eggstravagant Math Activity. Enjoy a great activity I’ve completed with First Graders & Middle Schoolers! Every year around spring break I’ve enjoyed executing this wonderful fun egg math activity with my students. There’s minimal prep time and materials for this activity.

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Math Menus

By Shametria L. Routt of The Routty Math Teacher

Menus, a content-focused set of options from which students choose activities and tasks on which to work, are a great way to add some challenge and pizzazz to your everyday mathematics curriculum and can be created for a variety of purposes and designed to include a variety of activities. In this 4-part series, I share four of my favorite math menus that provide instant opportunities for differentiation because students choose which activities they would like to complete based on their own interest and ability levels. Each post describes a different menu, provides examples of how to use it, illustrates advantages and disadvantages, and includes sample work from some of my past students.

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Recharge Your Batteries!

By Megan Bodman of Adventures in Teaching 4th

Get 8 tips for recharging your batteries during the time of year when stress is high!

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Easter STEM Olympics

By Kerry Tracy of Kerry Tracy

Blog post outlines 5 egg-celent Easter-themed STEM challenges that can be modified for use with grades 2-8: Nice Nest, Carrot Carriage, Bean Bind, Basket Bounce, and

 Egg-hanced.

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Increasing Student Time On Task

By Marcy Howe of It’s a Teacher Thing

Increase student time on task with a few simple yet effective tools.

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Zones of Regulation: Using Visuals for Feedback and Self-Regulation

By Thia Triggs of Print Path

Do your children shut down or act out when they hear your voice giving then behavioral cues and feedback?  If so, visual cues can be a lifesaver!

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If This Spells D-E-A-D How Do You Spell Head?

By Susan Berkowitz of Susan Berkowitz

Manipulating sounds in words can be a very difficult task for students who just can’t figure out how the individual sounds go together to make words, and how they can come apart.

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Here’s your chance to hop on over and visit the blog posts of our creative teachers


Let’s Go Fly a Kite

By Deann Marin of Socrates Lantern

 

When I taught special needs kids, each month we would do something special for those who earned enough points. One of their favorite activities was to make and fly kites in March. child-flying-a-kite smallYears later, I was mainstreamed to 6th grade and the children also loved  this activity.  After they flew their kites, they wrote two papers, one explaining how to make a kite and the other about their experience.

I am going to show you how to make simple kites that your class will love doing.

Materials for a garbage bag kite:  plastic bags, two sticks, string, a ribbon and a nice windy day.

Step 1:  Take two sticks, wooden dowels, or garden stakes and put them into the shape of a cross., one horizontally and one vertically. Place the horizontal stick about a third of the way down and tie them together with a string.

Step 2: Wrap the string securely around the horizontal and vertical sticks so that they stay together.

Step 3:  Cut the bag to fit the kite frame. Secure tightly by tying the ends of the bag to the frame at the tip of each dowel or stick.

Step 4:  Tie string from one side of the horizontal stick to the other, make it loose so that it forms a triangle, see first picture in step #4. Tie a large ball of string to thebottom part of the vertical stick. Loop under the loose portion of the horizontal string and tie a knot then tie another knot where the horizontal and vertical strings meet. You’ll know you’ve done it right if you see a triangle shape. See 2nd image in step #4.

Step 5: Tie some colorful ribbons to the end of the kite to give it balance. If it seems flimsy , you can attach washers to the ribbons to add support.

Step 6: Voila, your kites are complete. All you need is a sunny and windy March day and some space for your kids to run with their kites. Have fun. By the way, you can have a contest to see which kite flies the highest or the best.

 

Another fun thing that I’ve done with the kids is to take them camping at the end of the school year, but that’s another story.

 

Featured Items

View my Interactive Poetry Notebook at Socrates Lantern's Tpt Store

Interactive Poetry Notebook

Thanks so much for stopping by.

Deann

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Please visit Socrates Lantern’s Social Media Sites





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March Teacher Talk.003

Before you leave, please take a look at the rest of the blog posts that are part of our March Teacher Talk blog hop.


February Teacher Talk

Posted by Deann Marin of Socrates Lantern



Welcome to our February Teacher Talk.  All of us from the Teacher Talk collaborative would like wish you a Happy Valentines Day.  We have so many fab things this month from  proof-reading ideas, to ELA to math activities, to celebrating Black History Month and President’s Day, you don’t want to miss reading these blog posts from some awesome educators.

If you’re interested in joining this unique group of teacher entrepreneurs and blogging buddies and our blog linky, sign up here….The Best of Teacher Entrepreneurs Marketing Cooperative. If you decide to join, be sure to mention one of our names. 

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The Proof is in the Pudding, Proof-Reading That Is!

As a veteran English and Social Studies teacher, I’d like to share some effective proof-reading tips that I’ve used to help students improve their writing skills, and to make my life a bit easier.


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Love is All We Need

By Retta London of Rainbow City Learning

Just a little inspiration for building confidence and acceptance in your learning community.

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IMWAYR: Funny Bones

By Lisa Robles of LisaTeachR’s Classroom

Have you read Funny Bones? Winner of multiple awards and a great informational addition to your Dia de Los Muertos collection!

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Valentine’s Day STEM Olympics

By Kerry Tracy of Kerry Tracy

Blog post outlines 5 infatuating Valentine’s Day-themed STEM challenges that can be modified for use with grades 2-8. Help Cupid get some target practice, build a tower of love, design the perfect candy container, find the “heaviest” heart, and have a flower frenzy!

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 Cooperative Learning – Bring Core Subjects Together for Student Learning!

By M. Moore of Moore Resources

 Cooperative Learning – Bring Core Subjects Together for Student Learning!

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What Word Does This Say: B-L-E-N-D?

By Susan Berkowitz of Susan Berkowitz

This is part of a series of posts about phonological awareness and the different steps and skills to teach. This post is about blending sounds and syllables to hear the word.

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Teaching Self-Regulation Skills to Elementary Age Children

By Thia Triggs of Print Path

Finally! A systematic method to teach self-regulation skills to children with sensory, emotional, and behavioral needs. Color coded task cards give students managed choices to learn specific skills that meet their sensory needs and also calm them down, so that they can perform their academic classroom tasks.

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My Funny Valentine: Love Letters by Arnold Adoff

By Tracy Willis of Wild Child Designs

A review and glimpse into “Love Letters” poetry by Arnold Adoff. This post also includes a teaching idea for its use in the classroom.

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Robots + Math & Science = Total Engagement

By Megan Bodmann of Adventures Teaching 4th

Get your students engaged in learning by introducing robots into your classroom. They are not only a ton of fun, but you can easily utilize them in your math and science lessons. Find out how easy it is to do!

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Playground Problem = Real Life

By Kathie Yonemura of Tried and True Teaching Tools

The Playground Problem is a real-life math challenge! It keep students engaged and practicing their area and perimeter skills in a meaningful way.

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Understanding Fractions: A 6-Part Series

By Shametria Routt of The Routty Math Teacher

Fractions– a single word that deflates the confidence of our most competent students and adults alike. In this series, I share some of the essential fraction understandings that I have developed over the years, including the many math tools you can use to reinforce these essential skills. With that in mind, each of the six posts highlights a fraction tool and activity that can be used to address a specific Common Core Math Standard (with a few printable freebies too). 

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Leveled Math Assessments

By Tammy Roose of Tarheel State Teacher

Do your math assessments encourage a growth mindset? Create an entry point for students who are not yet meeting the standards? Allow above average learners to show they know more than just what’s expected for their grade-level? Find out 7 reasons why I’m committed to leveled math assessments this year! 

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Here’s your chance to hop on over and visit the blog posts of our creative teachers.


The Proof is in the Pudding-Proof-reading That Is!


By Deann Marin of  Socrates Lantern

As a veteran English and Social Studies teacher, I’d like to share some effective proof-reading tips that I’ve used to help students improve their writing skills, and to make my life a bit easier.

 

This is simple but a tough one for the kids to remember. When writing a rough draft they should skip a line between sentences. This will leave room for proof-reading comments. We are programmed to finish writing one line and just going to the next, so students will really need to remember this.  I’ve often told them to use a marker or pen and put a dot at the beginning of each line that they should write on. This helps a great deal. Eventually they will get it and it will become second nature.  Also, letting them know that as  part of their final grade, they get credit for skipping lines on their rough draft.

Always write rough drafts with a pencil if not using a computer. At the top of their paper, the student should write each area that will be proof-read.  This depends on what you are teaching at the time. After proof-reading has been finished,each student must initial the part that they corrected.

Proof-reading is a group effort.  So I have the class get into their collaborative groups of 4.  I will direct them and let them know exactly what to do.  Each child will have a specific thing to look for, depending on the lesson. If you’re using sensory words, descriptive adjectives, topic and detail sentences, capitals and end punctuation,  figurative language etc. they will proofread accordingly. It is really up to the individual teacher.  All corrections should be written in pen or different colored pencils. Here are some examples:

  1. One child will make sure that the paper makes sense. They will read it and add corrections on the blank lines.
  2. Another child  will look for colorful words such as adjectives, sensory words.
  3. Someone else will circle spelling errors with red.
  4. The fourth child will fix punctuation and grammar.  They might underline grammar mistakes, or circle them with a blue pencil.

Each child in the group starts with someone else’s paper. I give them a certain amount of time to read and correct it, 10-15 minutes or so. After 15 minutes have passed, they give the paper to the next person in their group, and they do their specific job. This continues until all the corrections have been completed. They must remember to initial the part that they corrected see tip #2.

Once the proof-reading has been finished, I let the class know that they will be reading each other’s paper to them to hear how it sounds.  It’s easier to pick up mistakes when you hear it out loud, rather than reading it to yourself. This can get noisy, so they should use inside voices.

  1. When child A reads child B’s paper, child  B has to listen, and vica versa. You do this for all papers in each group. If errors are picked up, they can be worked on, corrected and read aloud again.

As an extra incentive, tell your kids  that if a paper that they corrected has no mistakes, they will get extra points towards the final grade on their own paper. This will get the class to take this exercise seriously.

  1. John, Sarah, Sally and Andrew are in group A. John fixed spelling errors on the papers in his group.  No one has spelling mistakes, so  I  would give him 4 extra points, 1 point for each paper that has been proof- read.  Do this for everyone in the group. Use your own discretion.

When the final drafts are collected, they should include pre-writing, and rough drafts with comments and corrections. I let the them know that if they’ve followed directions and handed everything in as  instructed, they will get credit for it.

I hope this post has been helpful for you. Would love to hear feedback.

Thanks for stopping by.

Deann

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Here’s a Valentine Day Bundle with writing tasks, pr-writing activities, rough draft and more.

Recently Updated

Valentine Literacy Bundle

Take a look at my Winter Literacy &amp; History Bundle with Items that will spark the curiosity of you and your students…..
Recently Updated1

Winter Literacy History No Prep Printables

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Please visit Socrates Lantern’s Social Media Sites





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This is part of February Teacher Talk. Don’t forget to read what the rest of these educators  have to say….


January Teacher Talk

Posted by Deann Marin of Socrates Lantern

 

                      

Happy New Year 

All of us from the Teacher Talk collaborative would like wish you a

healthy, happy and wealthy 2016. May all of your wishes and dreams become a reality.


If you’re interested in joining this unique group of teacher entrepreneurs and blogging buddies and our blog linky, sign up here….The Best of Teacher Entrepreneurs Marketing Cooperative. If you decide to join, be sure to mention one of our names. 

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By Deann Marin of Socrates Lantern

As a child of the 60’s I remember so vividly that fateful April day in 1968 when Martin Luther King Jr. was brutally gunned down by James Earl Ray. I remember sitting by the television set, just horrified by what I had just witnessed.

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By Mary Moore of  Moore Resoources

ALL IN ONE: Statistics, Probability, Classroom Management, Scatter Plots, Student Engagement, & Graphing!

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By Thia Triggs of Print Path

Help your kids get the most out of waiting in line!

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By Kathie Yonemura of Tried and True Teaching Tools

A simple strategy for activating prior knowledge and gets students to make connections. 

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By Shametria Routt of the Routty Math Teacher

Math stations are one of the current hot button topics for educators and the sessions with the longest lines at any math conference because they are not only fun for students but can be adapted to address a whole host of learning styles– more than we can typically address in a whole class setting. However, using math stations effectively in the classroom can seem like an overwhelming endeavor for beginners. To support those teachers who have been wanting to get started with math stations and to share some of my favorite tips and techniques with beginners and novices alike, this 6-part series features the 5 Ws of math stations: Who, What, When, Where, and Why. 

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By Tammy Roose of Tarheelstate Teacher

Are you ready to harness your greatness in 2016? I’m recommending 3 of my favorite resources for developing new positive habits and being the best you can be! Happy New Year! 

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By Susan Berkowitz of Susan Berkowitz

Phonological awareness refers to awareness of and access to the sound structure of language. Spoken words are comprised of strings or sequences of phonemes that signal different meanings. Awareness that changes in these sequences result in changes in meaning is crucial in literacy skills development. If a student cannot conceptualize the order of sounds and syllables in words, he cannot associate the sound units with written symbols.

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By Lisa Robles of LisaTeachR’s Classroom

Books and resources to teach kindness.

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By Kerry Tracy of  Kerry Tracy

If your 4th – 8th grade students are struggling to produce grade-level writing, start here!

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By Tammy DeShaw of The Owl Teacher

Are you looking for some great ideas for teaching about Martin Luther King Jr? This blog post is a great opportunity to still teach your reading common core while teaching about this legend. The great part? A freebie to help you get started is included!

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By Thia Triggs of Print Path

Can you read these letters? Do you know why they are so hard to read? What can we do as teachers to prevent this?

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By Marypat Mahoney of Just Add Students

Keep writing projects from lingering on and on by using a writing scheduler.

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Gifts of the New Year

By Retta London of Rainbow City Learning


Now that “the holidays” are over, the decorations are packed away, and the ribbons, bows, tinsel, and paper have been disposed of, many of us think that the huge whoosh of gifting is over. I disagree! January is the perfect time to gift yourself! Here are some gifts that I hope you will lavish upon yourselves during the often cloudy, gray, and chilling days of January!



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Helping Reluctant Readers Find the Magic

By Marcy Howe of It’s a Teacher Thing

How can you help your reluctant upper elementary and middle school readers? Check out this veteran teacher’s post on how she helps struggling readers.


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Finding Balance & Doing the Fandango

By Tracy Willis of Wild Child Designs

Quick! Can you stand on one foot and cross your eyes? Me neither! Find out how this teacher is reclaiming her sense of balance.

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From teaching math to writing to reading to learning how to form letters properly, to celebrating Martin Luther King, you don’t want to miss reading these fabulous blog posts from some awesome educators.


December Teacher Talk

 Posted by Deann Marin of Socrates Lantern
 
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Happy Holidays Everyone, Welcome to our December Teacher Talk Blog Hop.
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By Mary Moore of Moore Resources

 The Scientific Method is Fantastic for All Subjects and for Life! The Scientific Method is a great method to use for teaching students how to solve problems and investigate questions in all educational subjects along with solving life situations.

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By Lisa Robles of LisaTeachR’s Classroom

If You Give a Reindeer a Root Beer… Studying Circular Plot Structure Have your students learned about circular tales? Here is how I used it in my classroom.

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The Perfect Snowman Craft!

By Tammy DeShaw of The Owl Teacher

Do you want to create the most adorable Winter Craft as a gift or just for fun? Check out this inexpensive and fun craft idea of making snowmen – out of socks!

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Can You Make a Snowman?

By Susan Berkowitz of Susan Berkowitz

Making a snowman is a favorite activity for kids in the winter. Almost everyone knows how to make a snowman. But can they tell someone else how to make one? Can they articulate the steps? Join Max and Mo in their story and learn sequencing and comparing language skills.

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Teacher Talk: Student Self Assessment

By Marypat Mahoney of Just Add Students

Give students the opportunity to self-assess their growth and learning thus far in the school year.

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Teaching Young Children to Write Their Names


ByThia Triggs of Print Path

An unfortunate myth is that young children, 3 & 4 years old, should learn to write their name with an initial capital letter followed by lowercase, rather than all capitals. Research shows that to be incorrect and even detrimental, for several reasons.

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Christmas-Winter STEM Olympics

By Kerry Tracy of Kerry Tracy

Keep kids engaged this holiday season with five festive, fun, & fabulous Christmas/Winter themed STEM challenges that can be modified for use with grades 2-8! 


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Five Ways to Increase Students’ NWEA Math Scores

By  Crystal Brown of  Dr Crystal Brown

Do you want to make sure your students reach their growth targets in math? Learn five ways you can easily implement into your math instruction. 


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How to Help Beat the Holiday Blues

By Deann Marin of Socrates Lantern

We all know that kids love to send notes to each other. This activity allows them to do that.


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What’s My Error? Extraordinary Math Hack

By Tammy Roose of The Tarheelstate Teacher

Do your students continue to make common errors when computing and learning different math concepts? Mine were too, until I instituted some fun error analysis with “What’s My Error?” problems! 

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Our Homes Have Stars

By Retta London of Rainbow City Learning

Sharing the holiday spirit in a classroom of diverse faiths.


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Critical Thinking with Pattern Blocks

By Shametria Routt of The Routty Math Teacher

Did you know that pattern blocks can be used for more than just teaching shapes in your geometry unit– pattern blocks can be used all year long! The proportionality of the pieces extends the number of ways in which they can be used, including analyzing the characteristics and common attributes of two-dimensional shapes, identifying fractional relationships, and building an understanding of operations with whole numbers. Check out this 5-part series to explore ways to get your students thinking critically with pattern blocks!


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Tantalizing Tessellations: Critical Thinking & Problem Solving

By Tracy Willis of Wild Child Designs

Project-orientated learning engages students and leads to critical thinking. It’s differentiation at its finest!

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Tips To Enjoy Holiday Teaching

By Michele Webb of Teaching Ideas for Those Who Love Teaching

Tips to keep holiday teaching fun and stress free.

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December in the Classroom

By Marcy Howe of It’s a Teacher Thing

Enjoy December in your classroom. Learn how to keep the curriculum challenging, your days calm, and find links to several “go to” items to help you enjoy December in your classroom.

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Magic Books Motivate Writing!

By Kathie Yonemura of Tried and True Teaching Tools

Students buy-in to writing if it is in a book. This magic book motivates students to compare and contrast!

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Please Read these great ideas that these educators are using for the month of December and beyond. 


November Teacher Talk

       By Deann Marin of Socrates Lantern  

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Read what these innovative teachers are doing in their classrooms 

Rainbow City Learning

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This is the Single Most POWERFUL Teaching Tool

By Thia Triggs of Print Path

If you are a teacher or a therapist, you will want to make sure you are using this tool to your fullest!

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How Do I Provide Therapy for AAC Users? Try This

By Susan Berkowitz of susan-berkowitz

Think speech therapy is different from what you do with other students? Think again. This post tells you why.

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My Life’s Work

By Thia Triggs of Print Path

Next month I’m going to be presenting my work on the automaticity of handwriting to a group of 150 Wisconsin school-based occupational therapists. I have a little little sneak preview for you, and a free gift – for a limited time.

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Silver Boxes: Gifts of Encouragement

By Kathie Yonemura of Tried and True Teaching Tools

Who doesn’t like presents? Silver boxes can transform your classroom! Teach students to give gifts of encouragement.

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Happy Native American Heritage Month

By Michelle Webb of Teaching Ideas For Those Who Love Teaching

Tips for Celebrating Native American Heritage

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9 Ways to Use Task Cards

By Mary Moore of Moore Resources

 Task Cards are so Versatile Even in Middle and High School! They are great because students feel they have a choice in which task they do first and in middle school this is a great way to engage students. Another benefit of task cards is that students do not feel overwhelmed by worksheet after worksheet of problems to do. It breaks up the day, week, or month. Read below about 9 ways you may use task cards.

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Thanksgiving STEM Olympics

By Kerry Tracy of Kerry Tracy

Five engaging Thanksgiving STEM challenge ideas to follow in the footsteps of the Pilgrims!

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Connecting Literature with our Latino Learners

By Lisa Robles of LisaTeachR’s Classroom

As a teacher in a Latino community (and a Latina), I am acutely aware that students need to see mirrors of themselves in literature. Here is a list of books I’ve read to my kids.

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Engaging Assessment Tools

By Shametria Routte of The Routty Math Teacher

Using a variety of ongoing assessment techniques is an important way to assess how students are progressing toward mastery of a concept or skill. Traditional methods include tests and quizzes; however, there are a host of other tools that will not only keep your students engaged but will also provide the feedback that you need to get a gauge on your students’ understanding. This post offers 5 engaging assessment tools that you can use to fill your assessment toolbox.

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New Blog Series: Extraordinary Math Hacks

By Tammy Roose of Tarheelstate Teacher

Sharpen your pencils, pull out your 10-sided dice and base-10 blocks, and get ready for some math lesson hacks that you can use right away! I’m going to show you some Extra-ordinary Math Hacks that take my math time from *yawn* to “da-Bomb!”

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TEACH KIDS TO BE THANKFUL THIS HOLIDAY WITH STONE SOUP

By Mary Carr of Carberry Creations

We know that social skills are important, and that many of our students could benefit from a bit of direct instruction in the matter, but alas, testing strategies prevail, and social skills fall to the back burner. Perhaps not today. I would like to share with you my favorite read aloud story for this time of year which will allow you to target the test taking strategies, and with only a little extra time from your day, you can integrate a bit of social skills curriculum in too (but shhh… don’t tell the politicians, or school administrators.)

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Connecting with Parents

By Dr Crystal Brown of Dr Crystal Brown

20th Century and 21st Century Communication Mash-Up: Learn two effective ways to communicate with students’ parents. 


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So Much to Be Thankful For

By Deann Marin of Socrates Lantern

As a teacher, I feel it’s part of my responsibility to help my students think about the good things that they have going, and to be thankful for their blessings.

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So Much to Be Thankful For

 

 

So Much to Be Thankful For!I can remember my grandmother sitting in her big rocking chair that was placed in her favorite spot, next to a picture window where she kept all of her plants. I would sit on her lap and she would sing about the beautiful autumn leaves dancing to the ground in their colorful dresses. I can’t remember the tune or the words, but that wonderful memory has always been vivid in my mind. as if it were yesterday. I’m so thankful for this experience.

I can remember standing on the front porch waiting for my mom to take me shopping downtown. I loved to shop with her. We used to go to a store called Eli Moore, they had everything that a little girl could want. First stop was the shoe department, and I’d get my black patent leather shoes, next we’d go to the clothes department. I was so spoiled back then, as an only child, I was showered with beautiful things to wear and great toys. Shopping done, we’d go to this café for lunch and a yummy desert. My mom passed on when I was 15 so these moments mean so much for me and I’m thankful for the short time that I was able to spend with her.

I have so many things to be thankful for, a wonderful husband, my Siberian Husky, friends and family who love me. We’re healthy, other than some aches and pains. Our house is in the woods and it is our own little paradise. I can’t think of anything else that I need, other than a few million dollars, lol!

As a teacher, I feel it’s part of my responsibility to help my students think about the good things that they have going, and to be thankful for their blessings. To introduce them to this activity, I tell them the story about my grandmother, and or my mom.  Then I will pass out task cards with Thanksgiving images on them and ask the kids to write down what they’re thankful for and we put them into a decorated Thanksgiving box. They can write as many things as they wish, The Wednesday before Thanksgiving recess. I pass the box around the room and each child, as well as myself, chooses a card and we read what is on it, then try to guess whose card it is and give it to its owner.

I usually end up moved to tears  and so do some of the kids, as this activity is so meaningful to all of us..

Please take a look at my values lesson

Seasonal November What I'm Thankful for

What Am I Thankful For?

Two November

Themed Activities

 

 

Please visit Socrates Lantern’s Social Media Sites






October Teacher Talk

By Deann Marin of Socrates Lantern

We’re so pleased to introduce you to the changes in our  “Sharing is Caring Teacher Blogging Collaborative!”  Our blog hop will now be known as “Teacher Talk.” We’ll be putting our ideas together to make your monthly planning not only easier but more timely, creative, and fun!.

There are so many dedicated teachers in our group who use new and different techniques to reach their students and we’ll be sharing them with you. So please join us each month when we bring you such topics as bully prevention, classroom management,  collaborative learning techniques, poetry lessons, math ideas, Freebies,  and so much more….

If you’re interested in joining this unique group of teacher entrepreneurs and blogging buddies as well as our blog linky, sign up here….The Best of Teacher Entrepreneurs Marketing Cooperative. If you decide to join, be sure to mention one of our names.

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Halloween Spooks-Creative Writing for Middle School

By Deann Marin of Socrates Lantern

The Legend of Sleepy Hollow by Washington Irving has always been one of my favorite tales.. When I was a child, we would often visit my Uncle Marty who had a farm near Tarrytown New York. Whenever we were up there, I would think of the Headless Horseman because that’s where the story took place. I could always visualize the Horseman with head in hand, chasing poor puny Ichabod Crane.

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A Simple Strategy to Teach About Goals

By Kathie Yonemura of Tried and True Teaching Tools

Teaching class goal setting makes an abstract concept more concrete. This simple strategy teaches children to break down a goal into manageable steps.

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Interactive Notebooks and CinderHazel

By Elizabeth Chapin-Pinotti of Elizabeth’s Lessons

Engaging Halloween Book Unit on CinderHazel that includes Interactive Notebook pages, printables and a whole lot more.

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By Mary Moore of Moore Resources

One of the largest things I had to do teaching middle school math was to find ways to engage students in math that absolutely did not like math or struggled with mathematics. Following are some strategies I utilized to assist my students.

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By Retta London of Rainbow City Learning

Ideas for bullyproofing your class this month.

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By Michelle Webb of Teaching Ideas of Those Who Love Teaching

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By Kerry Tracy of Kerry Tracy

Five fun & fabulous Halloween-themed STEM challenges that can be modified for use with grades 2-8!


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Solving Behavior Issues in the Community Meeting

By Tammy Roose of tarheelstate teacher

Need a simple way to improve poor student behavior in the context of your classroom environment? I’m talking about those times when it seems that the class in general is falling apart. Read all about the LOW PREP reflection process I use during classroom meeting to help students correct poor behavior and get our learning environment back on track.

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Teacher Talk: Homework

By Marypat Mahoney of Just Add Students

Homework: It can be a hot topic. Here are some tips for using, assessing it, and helping students get the most from it.

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Close Reading in the Classroom and a Freebie!

My Marcy Howe of Its a Teacher Thing

Looking to begin Close Reading in your classroom? Check out what’s happening in my classroom, how I introduced Close Reading, and where I’m going from here. You’ll find links to my newest Close Reading freebie!

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Best Tips to Help those Struggling Readers

By Lisa Robles of LisaTeachR’s Classroom

Here is what I cover during at risk conferences for approaching readers. It’s about tips, tricks, web sites and apps that can help.

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By Thia Triggs of Print Path

Our special kiddoes frequently have oral defensiveness and associated nutrition and dental hygiene issues.

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Fear Practice-Adverse results

By Carmen Doerr of The Bilingual Teacher

The administrator’s behavior affecting teachers’ work.

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Thanks so much for stopping by…..Chaio for now!

and don’t forget to be on the lookout for our November Teacher talk.




Getting Through Parents’ Night – Sharing is Caring Teacher Blogging Collaborative

By Deann Marin of Socrates Lantern

Do you ever find yourself losing sleep over parent night?

These seasoned educators from our Sharing is Caring Teacher Blogging Collaborative have some great tips for you.

Read what they have to say about the subject.

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By Marcy Howe of It’s a Teacher Thing

Make the most of your Back-to-School event. Organize your presentation, make sure you’ve given the essential information,

and make families feel comfortable and welcomed on your campus.

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By Retta London of Rainbow City Learning

A few tips to help you relax about your Parents’ Night presentation. You’ve got this!

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By Deann Marin of Socrates Lantern

I’d like to share what my partner and I have done to make parent night fun for everyone, including ourselves,

since neither of us likes to get up in front of an audience, other than our classroom, lol! 

Six Tips for Making Parent’s Night a Piece of Cake

By Marypat Mahoney of Just Add Students

Six tips to help you make the most out of Parent’s Night.

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Please visit the blogs from our Sharing is Caring Teacher Blogging Collaborative, you’ll be happy you did.

sharing is caring

                                     RCL


Not Another Parent Night!

 

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Are you thinking, Oh No!!! Another parent night, what am I going to do? Do you stay up worrying the night before?, or feel butterflies in your stomach? Are you self conscious about getting up and speaking in front of parents? Well, if you answered yes to any of these questions, you’re not alone.

My teaching partner and I came up with a way to make parent night fun for everyone, including ourselves, since neither of us likes to get up in front of an audience, other than our classroom, lol!

It happened one afternoon, after the kids had gone home.  We wanted to do something different for parent night.  Suddenly, the phrase, “Actions speak louder than words,” came into my head, and I had an Ah ha! moment. Why not show parents what our program is like instead of telling them.  That’s  how our Parent Night Video Program began.

We prepared for the  taping by making sure we got the go ahead from the principal as well ICS_MS_lockersas all the teachers who work with our students. Next we let our classes in on it, and they just loved the idea.

When the appointed day arrived, we were at the front door, camcorder in hand, to tape them as soon as they got off the bus. We were  greeted with waves and hellos as they entered the building and proceeded to their homerooms.

Mostly, we recorded  the kids, but we also wanted to show our teaching style so the parents could get to know us a little, We would go back and forth between rooms creating a short video of both. This can be tricky because the kids are alone for a few minutes just about every period. It’s amazing how much you learn about yourself and your charges when you watch yourself teach. We always made sure that we captured each child doing something, we never wanted anyone to feel left out, or for any parent to say, “I didn’t see my Sally.”

After period one which was either history or science, we’d escort them to Unified Arts, taping while walking. Some of them would be sewing, others would be doing woodwork, art, or metal shop. Again we would go back and forth between classes doing our filming. Parents loved to see them in action, we’d hear “oohs and ahs,” as they saw their little ones using power equipment, or sewing machines, and cleaning up after themselves. They were in amazed at the types of things the kids did, especially in metal/wood-shop, without losing fingers or limbs.

Unified Arts were over, we would then tape either English or Math classes  continuing to make sure that everyone was included.

At the finish of a busy morning,  we would switch classes and get ready to go to lunch. which is a real trip. We filmed them going through the lunch line and showed the cafeteria staff serving their food. Watching their child eat, and what they threw away was eye opening for many parents.

Back to class to continue taping either math, English, world history or science classes.  As the day drew to a close, you could still see us taping the children while in homeroom study period. and as their buses were being announced over the loudspeaker.  Our ending statement says it all, “The last bus has been called, the room is empty, and quiet and sometimes we like it like that.” We always get chuckles from the parents because they can relate.

Our final step, before parent night, was to send notes home letting them know that they will be viewing a  presentation of, A Day in the Life of their Child. Then we did some edits.

During the day of parent night, the class gets to see the end production, We give them popcorn or some type or snack and enjoy the movie together. We can now laugh at ourselves and congratulate the students for a job well done.

Parent night finally arrived and our production was ready for viewing. We introduced it and told them that the video will probably answer every question that they might have and it usually does. Jokingly we called ourselves Marin & Filipek DeMille after the Hollywood director Cecil B. DeMille and the parents cparents clappinghuckled over that. The ice had been broken and we’re ready to begin.

Of course, there were times when the unexpected happened, like the video player doesn’t work, or we can’t find the TV that we signed up for. We’re all human, and these things occur. We took it in our stride and the parents were understanding. Eventually, we got everything up and running and all were happy.

The best part is to watch the reactions of the parents as they watch their kiddos in action. They marvel at how busy they are and how
much work is done throughout the day. They’ve never seen how their child behaves in school and they just love this. Better still, they realize what a difficult job we, as teachers have trying to tame these middle school children.

 

 

 

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Please be sure to read the tips from these veteran teachers who are members of our Sharing is Caring Teacher Blogging Collaborative.

We’d love to hear from you, so please leave feedback.

sharing is caring


Discipline with Love

By Deann Marin at The Best of Teacher Entrepreneurs

 

Socrates LanternHeader Graphic small

Offering for Educators, Comprehensive Teaching Aides. If you’d like to see what else I have to offer please visit my store.

 

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Discipline with Love

 

I’ll never forget the book I read back in college called, Discipline Without Tears, by Dr. Rudolf Dreikers. “It provides a clear, constructive outline of his proven strategies for dealing with a wide range of childhood misbehaviors. Believing that children are social beings who want to belong, Dreikers stresses encouragement, cooperation, and firm control in a democratic alliance of parents, teachers and children.” Dreiker’s book has had a long lasting effect on me and my discipline techniques were based on what he said and I would highly recommend reading it.

I can’t express enough that one of the worst things a teacher can do is to prejudge a class or a student before they even enter the room. Let’s face it, some kids get along better with some teachers than they do with others, so it’s better to listen but with a grain of salt and make your own judgment.  I once had a young man come into my class with a really bad reputation, I was told that he had a bad attitude, didn’t listen, and yada yada yada yada. Needless to say, this boy was one of my favorite students. Sure he was talkative and questioned everything, he fooled around, but I loved his personality and sense of humor. He was an excellent student, a hard worker, and really cared about learning. What more could I ask for. His parents were, however, going through a divorce, and I always took this into consideration when working with him.

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Tip # 1

Let your students know that you care about them. Talk to them, find out what is going on in their lives. Are they from a broken home, did one of their parents die, are they going through a divorce, is there drug abuse in their family? There are so many reasons why children act out and these are only a few. I always try to put myself in their shoes and know that if I was going through some of the things that they’re dealing with I wouldn’t be able to concentrate or listen during class. I’d be thinking about the pain that I was going through. Many times kids will act out because they need attention, that they don’t receive at home. You might be the only one who takes the time to listen. This is why I love holding morning meetings. They can get what might be bothering them off their chests and be able to settle down for the rest of the day. It will make your life and theirs so much easier. Once the kids realize that you are there for them and you have their best interests in mind, they will do anything that you want, which includes appropriate behavior. 

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Tip #2

I’ve found that the kids want discipline, they want to follow rules, this helps to make them feel safe and secure. They like knowing what is expected of them. Ask what would happen if there were no rules. Most of them will say that nothing would get done, or that there would be chaos with everyone doing what they wanted. Then spend time setting up classroom rules with them. Ask for ideas, write them on the board, then vote for the ones that you all think are important. Help them to come up with consequences for their actions. This way, the kids will be heard, they will be making their own rules and most will follow them. 

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Tip #3

Be fair, set up consequences that fit the crime so to speak. Make sure that all of the children are treated the same way. One rule that I’ve found to be very effective is 3 strikes and you’re out. If you have to talk to a child 3 times during one period, there is a consequence, if he/she misses 3 home works in a semester, there is a consequence, if he or she is disrespectful, or bothers another child, there is a consequence, and so on. Be consistent, don’t give them chance after chance, they know the rules and if they choose not to follow them, it is their decision. 

NEVER show favoritism, the rules are for everyone. Let’s face it, we’re all human, we like some kids more than others, the trick is not to let them know. We don’t want to hear, ”Mrs. Smith likes Johnny better than me. He can do anything he wants and never gets in trouble.  Be firm, don’t raise your voice, let them know that you are in control in a kind and loving way.

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Tip #4

Keep in close contact with parents and or guardians.  Parents want to know when their little one has broken a rule, but they also like to hearwhen they have shown good behavior, have aced a test, have done a fantastic job on their homework, or have been kind to another student. Send a happy gram home, let everyone know how pleased you are. This helps to establish a good rapport with both parents and kids. They will know you care and will realize that you want what is best for everyone involved. It will make your life so much easier.

After grading a test, I will write a note to the student about their how they did. Even if they fail, I will always write something positive

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Tip #5

Lets say that Joey is a very needy child who constantly requires your attention, he is disruptive, causes arguments with others, can be a bully, you know the type. Sometimes the best way to deal with this behavior is to ignore it, and you need to teach the rest of the class to do this by rewarding them for not paying attention to him.  Peer pressure can truly be effective since everyone wants to be accepted. If the rest of the class really gets disgusted with Joey, some of them may actually talk with him about his actions, and this is more effective than you having to say something. This technique will work if the kids know that you care for them and are fair because their ultimate goal is to learn..

I’ve created a behavior modification bundle that can be utilized in a way to effectively help with discipline problems. 

2015-06-06

 

 

I hope some of my tips for a well behaved classroom will help you to have a great year.
Deann


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Tips for a Well Behaved Classroom-Sharing is Caring Teacher Blogging Collaborative 2

By Deann Marin of Socrates Lantern

Do you want to turn this years group into a Dream Class?

One of the most difficult jobs that a teacher has is to develop discipline techniques that will be effective for their classroom. These seasoned educators from our Caring is Sharing Collaborative have been there and done that. Read what they have to say about the subject.

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By Megan Bodman of Adventures Teaching 4th

Using Whole Brain Teaching to create a well behaved classroom is a “no brainer.” I’ve got 5 tips that will help your class be well behaved no matter the situation.

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By Marypat Mahoney of Just Add Students

Looking for help with classroom management? Check out these 5 simple tips.

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By Kathie Yonemura of Tried and True Teaching Tools

5-1/2 tried and true tips/resources to help your students focus on the positive behaviors.  

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By Deann Marin of Socrates Lantern

I’ll never forget the book I read back in college called, Discipline Without Tears, by Dr. Rudolf Dreikurs. “It provides a clear, constructive outline of his proven strategies for dealing with a wide range of childhood misbehaviors. Believing that children are social beings who want to belong, Dreikurs stresses encouragement, cooperation, and firm control in a democratic alliance of parents, teachers and children.”

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By Retta London of Rainbow City Learning

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Don’t forget to check out these posts for the classroom of your dreams.

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RCL

 


How to Get and Keep Parents on Your Side

By Deann Marin of The Best of Teacher Entrepreneurs

 

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Offering for Educators, Comprehensive Teaching Aides. If you’d like to see what else I have to offer please visit my store.

 

 

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I have observed many colleagues who are uncomfortable letting their hair down, so to speak, causing them to seem aloof and unapproachable. They feel as if they are above their students and parents. It shows in the way they deal with them. They will never admit that they’ve made a mistake, and if a child points something out to them, they become defensive, angry. and mean.  When this occurs, the kids and parents feel alienated  and you will have an uphill battle for the rest of the year.

One of the main things that I realized, after years of teaching is that parents need you to care about their child, they want you to make their learning experience interesting, challenging and fun. The best way to do this is to make sure their little one knows that you are there to listen, and support them with positive reinforcement and encouragement. It’s also important that they realize you are human, you  make mistakes, and you can laugh at yourself. Once you’ve established a good rapport with the kids, and they like you, the parents will like you as well. They will do just about anything for you and you will be able to maintain the optimal environment for learning.

When you meet parents, greet them with a sincere smile and make small talk. Express how much you enjoy working with the children, it is important to be upbeat, even if you have something negative to say. Begin with a positive comment about Johnny, especially if he is having issues, tell the parent in a supportive manner, For instance, suppose Johnny is talkative, he shouts out answers, talks to friends when you’re teaching a lesson, and is constantly fooling around. You know the type. You should NEVER begin with the negatives. If you begin the discussion of Johnny’s behavior on a negative note, you will turn the parents off and you will lose their support and quite possibly turn Johnny off to learning. End by saying something complimentary.

For example: “Hi  Mr. and Mrs. Jones, Johnny is such a good kid, he’s respectful, finishes his work, he has loads of friends, a good sense of humor and I really enjoy teaching him. As you know, he is all boy and full of energy. He can be a bit talkative and sometimes disruptive because he shouts out answers without raising his hand. I’ve talked about this with him, but he is still a having a tough time. Perhaps you could speak with him when you get a chance. I know that he will improve in this area with a bit of help from all of us.”

Follow up by making yourself easily available with emails, phone calls, letters home to keep everyone informed of progress made or further difficulties. Remember that parents are sensitive where their child is concerned. So tread as lightly as you can. Be diplomatic and choose your words well.

Of course, as we all know, there are some students and parents who are an added challenge. We have to try harder and have almost limitless patience. Tact is the word here.  If Elizabeth’s mom is defensive and becomes confrontational, it is up to you to diffuse this anger. Speak calmly,  DON’T raise your voice, REMEMBER, you are a  professional.

I have had parents come in, very upset about a grade, or thinking that I was unfair, or that I hurt their child’s feelings. If something akin to this occurs, break the ice by saying something that lets them know you hear their complaint and are prepared to work with them in correcting it.

You could say:

“I am so sorry that Elizabeth believes I don’t like her, not my intention at all. As a matter of fact I like her a great deal, especially her jokes, she keeps me laughing. She received a low grade on her  test because”…Give your reasons for the negative grade. Make sure the parent understands your reasoning and reassure them that you are here for their child and want to see them succeed in this class.

The parent is satisfied, I’m feeling better about what has occurred and we’ve strengthened our relationship. As you can see, a bit of understanding, empathy and kindness goes a long way.2015-06-06

I’ve come up with a Growing Behavior Modification Bundle that has everything you need to help produce positive behavior and communicate effectively with parents.

 

 

 

 

Thanks for stopping by….I’d love to have you follow me.

Deann

 

 

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