Tag Archives : phonics


Les sons – apprendre à lire

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Les-sons-apprendre-a-lire-1804300

 

Les sons - apprendre à lire

 

Product Description
Les sons « Cartes éclair »
Voici une série de 96 cartes «éclair» pour faciliter l’apprentissage des sons communs en français.
Le visuel facilite la reconnaissance des mots et des sons.Les sons suivants sont inclus avec achat :
– ch – ou – ui – en, em – an – au
– eau – in – om – ein – oi – on
– eu – gu – gn – ai – ei – er
– qu – ille – ail – eille – euille –
– ien – illon
Les cartes incluent aussi plusieurs mots communs et phrases simples pour faciliter la lecture.
It’s teaching made easy!Total Pages
96 slides
Answer Key
Does not apply
Teaching Duration
N/A

Child’s Play: Phonics Bingo Games

Perfect Activity for Last Days of School!

Simple to Use!

Great Phonics Review!

Provide extra review of short and long vowels with this Bargain Bundle: Vowels. Includes 24 classroom-tested cards and uncomplicated format with directions. Enjoy the smiles while your students review important phonics fundamentals. All Bingo Games are also available individually in the Reading Spotlight store.

 


Les sons – apprendre à lire

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Les-sons-apprendre-a-lire-1804300

 

Les sons - apprendre à lire

 

Product Description
Les sons « Cartes éclair »
Voici une série de 96 cartes «éclair» pour faciliter l’apprentissage des sons communs en français.
Le visuel facilite la reconnaissance des mots et des sons.Les sons suivants sont inclus avec achat :
– ch – ou – ui – en, em – an – au
– eau – in – om – ein – oi – on
– eu – gu – gn – ai – ei – er
– qu – ille – ail – eille – euille –
– ien – illon
Les cartes incluent aussi plusieurs mots communs et phrases simples pour faciliter la lecture.
It’s teaching made easy!

IF YOU ARE NOT ABLE TO OPEN THE PDF FILE, PLEASE
E-MAIL ME at teachwithpassion101@gmail.com . Be sure to include your e-mail address and buyer’s name. I will send you an attachment directly to your e-mail address.

Total Pages
96 slides
Answer Key
Does not apply
Teaching Duration
N/A

 

 


Les sons – apprendre à lire

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Les-sons-apprendre-a-lire-1804300

 

Les sons - apprendre à lire

 

Product Description
Les sons « Cartes éclair »
Voici une série de 96 cartes «éclair» pour faciliter l’apprentissage des sons communs en français.
Le visuel facilite la reconnaissance des mots et des sons.Les sons suivants sont inclus avec achat :
– ch – ou – ui – en, em – an – au
– eau – in – om – ein – oi – on
– eu – gu – gn – ai – ei – er
– qu – ille – ail – eille – euille –
– ien – illon
Les cartes incluent aussi plusieurs mots communs et phrases simples pour faciliter la lecture.
It’s teaching made easy!Total Pages
96 slides
Answer Key
Does not apply
Teaching Duration
N/A

Which letters are most important to young learners, and a fun (and FREE) activity!

Which letters are important to young learners, and a fun activity to do with them! Blog post by That Fun Reading Teacher


If you want to get children’s interest, ask about their world.It really does revolve around them! The letters young kids learn to identify first are those that they see most often. Many of these are the letters in their names.There are a number of benefits beginning letter learning with letters a child is most familiar with.

Children learn best when they are happily engaged in what they are doing and are most enthusiastic when they feel confident.

With that in mind, here is the ‘how-to’ on the preparation and lesson for the ‘Letters in your name’ flipbook:

Preparation:

  • Using 8 ½ x 14 paper, prepare the blank flip books.  If a child has six letters in his name, you will need three sheets of paper to lay one on top of the other, leaving approximately two centimeters, or just under an inch between the bottoms of each piece of paper.  When you fold the three papers in half, you will have six layers (see photo).  Staple these pages together, covering any sharp staple ends safely.  You now have the template for the ‘Letters in your name’ flipbook!  Be sure to adjust for the length of each child’s name.
  • Usually the children associate themselves with the first letter of their name.  Consider whether or not you would like a photo to be used on the front cover so it can be ready for the activity, or provide people shaped tracers or stamps, and students can personalize from there
  • Have a variety of options available to the children for illustrating the pages in their book.  As noted in The benefits of a personal alphabet book, it is important to find out what the child naturally associates with each letter sound on her own.  Reading Recovery teachers are equipped with a collection similar to the index car box in the photo, which allows for a quickly accessible variety of pictures for every letter.  If what the child suggests is not available, it can simply be drawn.  Many sticker collections can provide great content for these files as well as photocopies and pictures from fliers.  Holiday fliers are particularly useful.  ‘Witch’ and ‘ghost’ are popular alphabet book flier additions, thanks to Party Packagers and their terrific advertisements!

    A Reading Recovery teacher's alpha photo file.

    A Reading Recovery teacher’s alpha photo file.

Materials for the activity: 

  • Upper case and lower case letter stamps (optional, but helpful)
  • Prepared flip books (with child’s name lightly marked in pencil on the back)
  • Glue sticks and coloring materials
  • Small group setting (best done as a center)
  • Scissors if using fliers that have not been cut
  • Pictures for pages of flip books

The Activity:

  • Introduce the activity by talking about names, how special they are, and reinforce that individuality and uniqueness are positive traits.

    For Joshua, 'a' is for 'apple'

    For Joshua, ‘a’ is for ‘apple’.

  • Talk about the importance of the first letter of a name. Make big emphasis on capitalization here.
  • Show the kids a model of the ‘Letters in your name’ flip book and ask them if they notice anything different about the first letter.
  • If you are using stamps, show them the two sets.  Explain how to use them, and about the difference between the upper and lower-case set.
  • Explain that just like every person is different and special, everyone’s name book will also be different.  Even if two children have the same name, it is important for them to choose a picture that jumps into their own mind right away when they hear a letter sound.
  • Aim for two or three letters per day with each child.  Say the letter sounds for the kids and ask them what comes into their mind when they hear them.  If nothing, then leave that letter and move on.  It is okay to leave a page blank.  This is the start of a record of the child’s letter learning.
  • Allow the children to make their pages special with colour and décor.
  • Once the class is finished with this activity, send it home to be shared, but only after the information is transferred into a more permanent alphabet book that the child will continue to work on at school. This alphabet book will be a reference for the entire school year, and perhaps the next one, too.
  • Have the children ‘read’ their ‘Letters in your name’ flipbook to others with pride.  Reading buddies, volunteers, family members etc.
  • Most importantly have fun!

What are some ways you introduce letter learning to kids?

 

Related:

 

The benefits of a personal alphabet book - lessons learned from my Reading Recovery days. A blog post by That Fun Reading Teacher.

 

Best wishes with Back to School, everyone!

 2015 TpT Store Prof pic circle

Benefits of a personal alphabet book – a lesson from my Reading Recovery days

The benefits of a personal alphabet book - lessons learned from my Reading Recovery days. A blog post by That Fun Reading Teacher.

 

Why go to the trouble of creating a personal Alphabet Book for your students, instead of having everyone in the class work through each letter together? It sounds like a lot to manage, but creating links to a child’s life early in literacy learning is worth the confidence and gains they make later.

When I taught Reading Recovery to grade one students early in the school year, creating a personal alphabet book was one of the first things we did together when we started lessons. It wasn’t until seven years in to my teaching career that I understood the benefits of a personal alphabet book, and I have Dr. Marie Clay and my Reading Recovery teacher leaders to thank for that.

In Literacy Lessons Part Two, Dr. Clay explains:

The alphabet book is merely a record of what is known with spaces for what is ‘yet to be learned’  That gives the child a sense of the size of the task and a feeling of control over his own progress.  It also provides a location to return to when a troublesome letter, still being confused, turns up. (p37)

She explains that children do not generally learn to identify letters by name or sound in alphabetical order and that identifying a letter by name or sound is equally useful for a child early on, as it is most effective to teach both name and sound together.

 

When children have one word for each letter that he or she knows for sure makes that letter sound, they use it as an anchor, a concrete example to hold all other words against for comparison.

When they have their own sound alphabet that they have created from the words most meaningful to them, the words that pop into their minds with the initial letter sounds and that association gives them confidence that they know that particular sound.  It gives them the confidence to ‘spit’ that sound out when they see an unknown word on a page when they are reading, or put down that first letter when attempting to write a word they have never attempted before.

The personal alphabet book is the ultimate, at-a-glance reference guide. It is meaningful to each child, because that child constructed it from people and things that are meaningful to them already. The connections are already in place.

The key to the effectiveness of a personalized alphabet book is in its construction.  It must be done slowly but with enthusiasm, following the child’s lead, reviewed often and used as reference.

Years ago, we spent hours cutting up old coloring books and worksheets to use as images for our students’ alphabet books. This led to the creation of a kit as a time-saver! Try it free in the BTS Sampler, linked below!

Ready to create a personal alphabet book? Here’s how.

Related:

The Complete Alphabet Book Kit #BTS Big Bundle by That Fun Reader Teacher

Free Back to School Sampler by That Fun Reading Teacher How to create a personal alphabet book - a post by That Fun Reading Teacher.

Best wishes for Back to School, everyone!

I.M. That Fun Reading Teacher!


 2015 TpT Store Prof pic circle